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Home > World News > Defence News > NATO Multinational Battlegroup In Romania

NATO Multinational Battlegroup In Romania

NATO Battle Group in Romania [© NATO Multimedia]

French and Polish troops with the NATO multinational battlegroup train in Romania where they are deployed following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

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French and Polish troops with the NATO multinational battlegroup continue to train in Romania, where they are deployed following Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine.

French and Polish forces deployed to Romania as part of the new NATO multinational battlegroup held a live-fire exercise alongside their Romanian counterparts at Cincu Training Area, Romania. They practised various infantry operations, including involving vehicles, and held a fire-and-manoeuvre drill where the three countries executed a simultaneous simulated attack. French troops with the 126th Infantry Regiment, as well as soldiers with the French Army’s 93rd Mountain Artillery Regiment participated in the drills. The latter tested their endurance against a gruelling long-distance obstacle course.

Following Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine, NATO reinforced its presence in the eastern part of the Alliance, establishing four more multinational battlegroups in Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania and Slovakia. This decision is part of a package of measures aimed to strengthen NATO’s deterrence and defence posture in light of the changed security environment. These new battlegroups are in addition to the four which are already operational ever since 2017 in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland. France leads the NATO multinational battlegroup in Romania.

[© NATO Multimedia]

This NATO Multimedia footage, captured late April and made available to us Friday 13th May, includes shots of soldiers running an obstacle course and engaging in a live-fire exercise, as well as interviews with French and Polish officers.

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Transcript:-

  • (00:00) French soldiers run through obstacle course
  • (01:07) Polish soldier prepares for live-fire exercise
  • (01:12) Romanian soldiers stand in formation with Polish and French soldiers
  • (01:16) French Army VAB armoured personnel carrier moving out
  • (01:20) Romanian Army Piranha infantry fighting vehicle moving out
  • (01:29) French, Polish and Romanian vehicles moving across field
  • (01:36) VAB gunner engaging targets with .50 calibre machine gun
  • (01:38) French soldiers dismounting from VAB
  • (01:47) French soldiers engaging targets
  • (01:57) Polish Army KTO Rosomak infantry fighting vehicles engaging targets
  • (01:59) Polish soldier during live-fire exercise
  • (02:23) Polish soldiers during live-fire exercise
  • (02:28) French soldier inspecting weapons following live-fire exercise
  • (02:32) French soldiers departing live-fire range
  • (02:45) Soundbites: (French) Lieutenant Colonel Adrian, Deputy Commander, NATO Multinational Battlegroup Romania“The battalion was deployed at the end of February following the Russian Army attack in Ukraine, to protect NATO borders… And especially in the first weeks of the deployment, we felt that it was a very important, historical moment and we also feel the responsibility that we have as leaders of this battalion… The responsibility that we have to demonstrate our capabilities to be ready, totally ready with our Allies to fulfil the mission that we have been given… What I realised is that we are very close to each other, whether we are Polish or Romanian, even if we maybe have different cultures, we have the same references. So it’s actually quite easy to integrate and to become comrades and we learn about the different weaponry, the different procedures that can vary from one country to another, but in the end it’s quite easy to integrate and to work together.”
  • (03:49) Soundbite (Polish) Second Lieutenant Sierpinski, Platoon Commander, 17th Mechanised Brigade, Polish Army: “Of course, for us, as Polish soldiers, the situation in Ukraine is particularly acute because our assistance to refugees and our military involvement in NATO operations are both quite important. I also think our contribution is noticeable to our Allies. As far as our feelings are concerned, we are simply in a state of readiness. We observe events and wait for orders. We have been here for quite some time. We are well-trained and well-prepared for any eventuality.”

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